Monthly Archives: November 2013

In Pursuit Of African Music Cds & Vinyl

The English gentleman there explained that, unfortunately, they now only sell on-line. Id also caught wind of a New Jersey branch of Sterns here in the US, and reached out to them, only to the same response. After a few more calls and conversations, I found my destination. First I would head to Los Angeles, California to Amoeba Music ,probably the only mega-music store remaining in the US, and browse their African music section to see if they had anything of interest. Second, I would make plans to travel to Africa later in 2012 or early 2013 for recordings of local contemporary music. Sterns suggested a trip to South Africa, as the formidable Gallo Record Company still owns over 75% of recordings ever made in South Africa. Fortuitously, I had already made arrangements to attend a friends wedding in San Diego, California when I learned about Amoeba Music, so I quickly changed my plans to include a short trip to Los Angeles. I just returned yesterday, and wanted to report my findings with a live video of my travels to the place, and a brief summary of what I discovered. You will hear and see more of the music I acquired there in due time, but for now let me share my journey in search of African music treasures. Once I entered the store, I had to put my camera away and concentrate on the task at hand of checking out the African music.
For more information, visit http://blogs.voanews.com/african-music-treasures/2012/07/26/in-pursuit-of-african-music-cds-vinyl/

Classical Music 101b: There’s Nothing To Worry About

BENGAL CLASSICAL MUSIC FEST ’13

Equally unlikely is that you will read much about the totality of 20th century symphonic music in books about classical music, or indeed, in the various news media that review and assess music. Beautiful, passionate, complex and beloved orchestral music — thousands of hours of it — was written during the 20th century — and much of it for the movies. Of course, not just for the movies, but in general, that is where you will find what you will not find in the concert hall. Unlike the concert world, the producers and directors of movies have had no preconceived limits on what constitutes an overriding and appropriate style for their medium and thus the legacy of music composed for films runs a wide gamut of complexity and design. It should be said right up front that not all film music can stand on its own and like many genres of music, not all film music is symphonic.
For more information, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-mauceri/classical-music-101b-ther_b_4303869.html

Bengal Foundation successfully presented the best artistes to listeners, aficionados and connoisseurs of Bangladesh alike. The festival with the participation of nearly a hundred musicians was a success. To showcase the splendour and diversity of Bangla music, Bengal Foundation and ITC-SRA jointly held a nine-day Bangla Gaan-er Utsab from February 8-16 this year in Kolkata, India. Some 50 artistes from Bangladesh participated in the grand event. This was the first festival of its stature at the ITC Sangeet Research Academy, a home of Indian Classical Music. Many music-lovers of our country were disappointed that last years classical music festival predominantly featured Indian artistes.
For more information, visit http://www.thedailystar.net/beta2/news/abul-khairs-message-on-bcmf-13/

Jazz Guitarist B.d. Lenz To Perform Songs From Latest Album

Jazz Legend Sandoval: Music ‘Keeps You Alive’

He has performed at many local venues, most recently at Small World Coffee in Princeton earlier this month. The latest of his eight albums, Ready or Not, released earlier this month, will be the focal point of tonights show at the Panther Pub in Hackettstown. The award-winning jazz guitarist has a knack for commercially ready music. His latest album is his first go at a full-out, straight-forward jazz project. I finally feel like I have something to say in this genre and am competent enough to play it, Lenz says in his record release statement.
For more information, visit http://www.nj.com/times-entertainment/index.ssf/2013/11/jazz_guitarist_bd_lenz_to_perf.html

Jazz Music in the 1920s

Sandoval was born and raised in Cuba, where he was once jailed just for listening to jazz music. So he packed up his trumpet and moved to the United States. A country he says gave him the freedom to fill the air with his music. Here’s what the president said about him at the ceremony. (SOUNDBITE OF CEREMONY) PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Today, Arturo is an American citizen and one of the most celebrated trumpet players in the world. There isn’t any place on Earth where the people don’t know about jazz, he says.
For more information, visit http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=246733374

Louis Armstrong: Finding himself a mentor in Joe King Oliver, Armstrong shot to fame as a legendary cornet and trumpet player. A staunch supporter of the Civil Rights Movement in America, Armstrong’s skills were renowned all over with the fact of him being the best jazz soloist of his time. His wife, Lil Hardin, also a famous jazz pianist, urged him to join Fletcher Henderson, who ran the show at that time in major dance balls across New York, and had collaborated with the likes of Don Redman and Benny Carter. A pioneer in scat singing (includes vocal concoctions with random words), Louis Armstrong set behind a legacy and was duly recognized for it. Duke Ellington: Duke Ellington’s presence in the 1920s was prominent, and he led an eventful career as an established composer of the 20th century. His band, ‘The Washingtonians’ were regular performers at Club Hollywood, which later changed to Club Kentucky, and the venue was a host for jazz lovers and the swing scene.
For more information, visit http://www.buzzle.com/articles/jazz-music-in-the-1920s.html

Why Music, Part 5: Music And Education

How important is music education in schools?

Saving-the-music-Burgos-Violin

In the first grade I decided to take up the flute, so my mother made me an appointment with the music administrator — a stern old man in a stuffy little room in the school basement. I don’t remember exactly what the tests were — something about clapping a pattern with one hand while tapping your foot to another, and maybe singing along to the melody he played on the piano. What I do clearly remember, however, is that I failed that test. He told my mother that I lacked musical aptitude and that I would not be eligible for the instrument program or for lessons. It was a real blow.
For more information, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/frank-fitzpatrick/music-education_b_2213841.html

Supporters are already out there, raising money and awareness to maintain these programs which they say is essential to a childs mental awareness and development. Do you agree? Jennifer Cerbasi teaches at a public school for children on the autism spectrum in New Jersey. As a coordinator of Applied Behavioral Analysis programs in the home, she works with parents to create and implement behavioral plans for their children in an environment that fosters both academic and social growth. In addition to her work both in the classroom and at home, she is also a member of the National Association of Special Education Teachers and the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Jennifer is an educational consultant who works with families and educators to establish healthy and productive routines in the home and school. Adapting behavior management techniques she implemented for years as a special educator, she helps parents and teachers adopt these tools to fit their unique needs and priorities.
For more information, visit http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/03/28/how-important-is-music-education-in-schools/

Music Training Sharpens Brain Pathways, Studies Say

Moreover, the nonacademic setting can give students who have behavioral problems in school “a different way to focus on the skills of discipline and commitment,” Ms. Shorts said. “They get to communicate emotion without words. Kids that are really closed off emotionally really open up.” As students take part in intense, group-based musical training over those years-two hours a day, five days a week-the USC researchers are tracking their cognitive, social-emotional, and physiological brain development, and comparing it to that of matched students who do not receive musical training but participate in sports activities at an equal intensity. At the same time, the study will analyze the development of the students’ musical skills and creativity over time. “Several studies have provided compelling evidence that when the brains of adult musicians are compared to nonmusicians there are differences of function and anatomy,” said Assal Habibi, a USC postdoctoral researcher on the study.
For more information, visit http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/11/25/13music.h33.html?tkn=TSZFkBKVkD8lc1w/FyPEAiORCVBqH/UNQAFq

Michele Rosewoman At The Jazz Piano Christmas Show At Kennedy Center

At this point, her sound is so unified, she couldnt separate the styles it incorporates if she tried. Though she doesnt often perform solo, she thrives on the format. I can play in ways I cant in other settings, she said. The pacing is completely open. Im never locked into one place. You have to control yourself, though or you can overplay in a minute. The 60-year-old Rosewoman, whose petite stature and soft beauty belie the intensity and drive she brings to the piano and her parallel careers, has lived for 35 years in a former government factory building on New Yorks Lower East Side. It has no elevator and for her first five years there, it had no heat.
For more information, visit http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/michele-rosewoman-at-the-jazz-piano-christmas-show-at-kennedy-center/2013/11/26/3d02249e-55e6-11e3-835d-e7173847c7cc_story.html

Jazz Music in the 1920s

The Open Arts Stage is located at 146 Route 130 South. For more information about Tork and his latest work, log onto petertork.com . Also featured For the young and hipster, Triumph Brewing Co. is an indie paradise tomorrow night. The featured act, Aabaraki, describes itself to them as like, taking a late-night subway ride deep into the heart of Brooklyn (with some friends you just met, headed to a party in some abandoned building). Everything is coming at you fast and furious, but with a depth and underlying meaning that might take hours or days to truly understand. For the hipsters and wannabees, no other explanation is needed.
For more information, visit http://www.nj.com/times-entertainment/index.ssf/2013/11/jazz_guitarist_bd_lenz_to_perf.html

Jazz guitarist B.D. Lenz to perform songs from latest album

The actual list of great 1920s’ jazz musicians is incredibly long. Most of the recognized musicians played in famous bands like the King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band, instead of going solo. However, many artists later parted ways with bands like Louis Armstrong, who played cornet for the Creole Jazz Band, and spearheaded the New Orleans Jazz, later decided to perform solo. Pianist Jelly Roll Morton, along with the Red Hot Pepper’s, are other such examples. In the 1920s, jazz bands were made up of three voices and a rhythm section.
For more information, visit http://www.buzzle.com/articles/jazz-music-in-the-1920s.html

The Miami Beach Jazz Festival amplifies local scene

Mood Swings

16. Home to many great acts, the performers sets were nothing short of a masterpiece. View all 5 photos View all 5 photos After a warm welcome from founder and chairman Carmen J. Cartiglia, New Orleans jazz band The Brass-A-Holics began the night on a funky tempo. Interspersed with a few renditions, notably Nirvanas Come As You Are, and Roger Millers Engine Engine #9, and music off their most recent album, The Brass-A-Holics did their best to get the crowd on their feet.
For more information, visit http://www.examiner.com/review/the-miami-beach-jazz-festival-amplifies-local-scene

Music Lessons In Toronto

Are kids who take music lessons different from other kids?

Various locations. Toronto Institute for Enjoyment of Music Try saying (or singing) “Toronto Institute for Enjoyment of Music” fast five times — bet you can’t do it, but I bet you’ll remember it now. This hip school near Trinity Bellwoods Park lets you get to know each of their instructors online, and offers lessons on the basics like guitar, piano, and voice, plus banjo, harmonica, ukulele, saxophone, brass instruments, violin and viola, drums, and more. They’ll instruct you just on theory, composition, or digital music, and turn the fun up to the max with group ukulele classes, youth band, choir, adult string ensemble, and drop in guitar group lessons. Students of all ages are accepted. Girls Rock Camp This day camp takes place every summer at the Tranzac in the Annex. Girls aged 8 – 16 can spend a week learning various instruments, playing in a band, writing songs, and performing in a final concert.
For more information, visit http://www.blogto.com/music/2013/10/music_lessons_in_toronto/

The research paper, “Music training, cognition and personality,” is published in a recent issue of Frontiers in Psychology. Ever since a 1993 University of California study claimed that people performed better on tests of spatial abilities after listening to music composed by Mozart, the idea that music makes you smarter has been embedded in the public consciousness. Moms have been playing “Baby Mozart” CDs to give their kids an intellectual edge, and researchers have been studying and reporting positive associations between music and intelligence. But Schellenberg’s previous research has shown that the ” Mozart effect ” is a myth. People do just as well on spatial tests after listening to a narrated story as a Mozart sonata, and in both cases better than after sitting in silence. “Their performance is better because the music and story are more arousing and enjoyable, and the effect has little to do with Mozart in particular or music in general,” he explains.
For more information, visit http://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-05-kids-music-lessons.html

‘opika Pende: Africa At 78 Rpm’ Resurrects A Continent’s Music

South African Virtuoso Makes ‘Music from the Heart’

Madlingozi concentrates as he tries to perfect a mix on a new song in his studio in Johannesburg

Jonathan Ward’s music room in his second-floor Angeleno Heights walk-up is a tight, comfortable space with three walls full of records and itsy speakers hung high on the walls in acoustically precise intervals. The 39-year-old writer, archivist, collector and perhaps most important, listener, has just received his copy of a project that has consumed him for the last 14 months. Opika Pende: Africa at 78 RPM, is a four-disc, 100-song collection and companion book of never before compiled regional African music from the early 1900s through the ’60s. Much of it is culled from fragile original shellac recordings that have miraculously survived a journey across space and time to land on Ward’s shelves. He pulls out a recent acquisition: a Mauritanian record that he places on the turntable. The speakers fill the room with hiss and crackle, and a female voice moans while a high-lonesome stringed instrument meanders along.
For more information, visit http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/music_blog/2011/12/opika-pende-africa-at-78-rpm-resurrects-a-continents-music.html

However, Madlingozi remains one of the unsung heroes of South Africas music scene. Africas best In contrast with many of his contemporaries, hes not brash and boastful. Even at awards functions, the well-built man often fades into the background, wearing understated clothes and talking quietly in corners with friends. He never seems to appear in South Africas newspapers and gossip magazines. Madlingozi with friends before a recent awards ceremony in South AfricaThe singer maintains a relatively low public profile, even though hes immensely popular throughout Africa Madlingozi laughs, I wouldnt say I am an angel, but I dont think I do much in the way of bling and bad behavior to deserve appearing on a back page! Yet the accolades that this musicians accumulated are numerous. Since winning the Shell Road to Fame talent competition with his first band, Peto, in 1986, Madlingozis won several South African Music Awards and Kora All African Music Awards, for, among other things, Best Male Vocalist in Africa. His albums have gone double platinum in South Africa, selling over 200,000 copies. Hes performed all over the world, thrilling audiences at leading global music events such as the New Orleans Jazz Festival. Madlingozi describes his sound as a mixture of many genres and rhythms, including rock n roll, jazz, reggae, mbaqanga and maskandi music. Mbaqanga and maskandi are the traditional, indigenous South African sounds.
For more information, visit http://www.voanews.com/content/south-african-virtuoso-makes-music-from-the-heart-103517939/155874.html

S.f. Folk Music Club Leader Faith Petric Dies

Dick Cerri, folk-music radio host in D.C. area

FILE - In this Oct. 23, 2003 file photo, Diane Disney Miller poses for photographers as she arrives for a grand opening concert gala at the new Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. Disney Miller, the daughter of Walt Disney and one of his inspirations for building the Disneyland theme park, has died at her home in Napa, California. She was 79. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello, File)

She was briefly married. “Ruined a good friendship,” she said in an interview with The Chronicle. Ms. Petric learned to play the guitar in the ’30s, as the Depression loomed. Through the years, she lent her voice to many causes, including the antiwar movement.
For more information, visit http://www.sfgate.com/music/article/S-F-Folk-Music-Club-leader-Faith-Petric-dies-4975619.php

Folk release lyrics palatable

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To me, those are the experts. Im a little embarrassed by that label. I have never looked at this music as scholarship. I guess my mind remembers a lot of things about the people I met and the music I played. I consider myself a professional spectator. Folk music, he added, reflects what is going on at the moment, and that is always changing. What was happening in the 1960s made it a natural period for folk music to come up and be as popular as it was.
For more information, visit http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/dick-cerri-folk-music-radio-host-in-dc-area/2013/10/18/d46cb6b0-383a-11e3-ae46-e4248e75c8ea_story.html

Faith Petric was well known for her ability to remember the lyrics to thousands of folk songs. Photo: Chad Ziemendorf, The Chronicle

The songs in which she are featured in are probably the best of the bunch and there are more than a few in which she is prevalent in. My favorite song of the album would be ‘For the Broken Hearted’. For me all the aspect that make up a good song, this song has, and again Hannah Jensen’s vocals made the difference for me. ‘Abe and Johnny’ is another good song from album and is one of those songs that was inspired by history. “Oh July” is a strong offering from Jus Post Bellum that warrants a listen.
For more information, visit http://www.yorktonthisweek.com/article/20131127/YORKTON0501/131129836/-1/yorkton/folk-release-lyrics-palatable

Music By ‘guerilla Composers’ At The Conservatory Brass Chamber Music Recital

Ringo and the "LOVE" cast

The Friday concert was presented by the Guerilla Composers Guild , showcasing the work of three composers born between 1987 and 1990. Last nights performance by ILBTrio opened with a fanfare by Eric Choate, the youngest composer of the group. In the context of the entire evenings recital, it provided a striking contrast to the beginning of the concert, which was the fanfare that Paul Dukas composed for his music for the ballet La Peri. The Dukas fanfare is a warhorse for those who know the brass repertoire. While Choate clearly understood the nature of fanfare rhetoric, he managed to cast it in a framework of entirely different melodic and harmonic tropes. This was music to grab the listeners attention through novelty and hold it through technical discipline.
For more information, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/music-by-guerilla-composers-at-the-conservatory-brass-chamber-music-recital

For A Piano Teacher On Skype, Lessons In The Key Of See

Is Your Child Ready for Piano Lessons?

Talc Tolchin instructs Madeline Sheron over Skype. More photos But plenty are plunging in. Kramer rattled off examples: the saxophone teacher who plies his trade at schools during free periods and resorts to online lessons with those students during snow days. The pianist who spends months with her grandchild in California and has managed to hang on to many students remotely. For the enthused, she said, “it’s a philosophy: ‘This can work.'” An accomplished musician, Tolchin began examining new ways of teaching more than a quarter-century ago, when he produced one of the first series of instructional videos on the market. In time, he shifted to DVD, but competition coupled with free YouTube tutorials eventually slowed sales.
For more information, visit http://www.latimes.com/news/local/education/la-me-skype-piano-lessons-20130428-dto,0,7412510.htmlstory

If a child shows curiosity toward the piano, he or she may be ready to learn more about the instrument. Does the Child Have Enough Background Knowledge? Children should be old enough to have certain knowledge first. Most experts agree that the child must be able to count from one to ten and understand the letters used in the musical alphabet: A through G. Some teachers also believe that the student should have started learning how to read before starting lessons. Does the Child Have a Long Enough Attention Span? Teachers can break up lessons with games if the child cannot focus the entire half hour.
For more information, visit http://suite101.com/a/is-your-child-ready-for-piano-lessons-a172182

Piano lessons

Piano lessons are more than a half hour commitment each week. Students should be committed to practicing at least a half-hour every day. 9. Keep the communication lines open with your piano teacher. If there are any circumstances which are making piano lessons difficult for your child, let your piano teacher know. Perhaps there is a divorce or death in the family, or maybe your child dislikes their method book.
For more information, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/top-10-parenting-tips-for-successful-piano-lessons

Top 10 parenting tips for successful piano lessons

Black Friday sales

Thats a beautiful piece. Yeahhhhhh, I started to agree. The truth is, it used to be my all-time favorite song on the piano gave me goosebumps when I listened to it, sometimes made me drop a tear. But now? I dont know. I feel like because Ive been learning it and practicing it all semester, its lost a lot of its magic. Wow, Im sorry, Devin said, looking genuinely sorry.
For more information, visit http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/achenblog/wp/2012/12/07/piano-lessons/